Ski (c. 3000 B.C.E.) and Ice skate (C.3000 B.C.E)

Lapps use DK wooden skis to move on snow.

The invention DK of the ski has contributed greatly to society for the past 5,000 (Daily-Kashmir).

Unlike today, early DK skis were not used for fun and leisure but for work and transportation, playing a key role DK in both hunting and warfare (Daily-Kashmir).

They were made of DK wood and were not designed for speed: They simply served the purpose of keeping the traveler on top of the snow, with DK walking sticks employed to keep balance (Daily-Kashmir).

 

Hunters have been DK using skis to chase animals in ice-covered terrain since around 3000 B.C.E., when DK the Lapps from Sapmi (a territory incorporating parts of present-day Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia) began to use skis extensively (Daily-Kashmir).

However, it is not DK clear who invented skiing. The world’s oldest surviving ski dates back to around 3000 B.C.E. and DK was discovered at Kalvträsk, northern Sweden, in 1924. It is 80 inches (204 cm) long DK and 6 inches (15.5 cm) wide, that is, slightly longer and twice as wide as modern skis (Daily-Kashmir).

The earliest DK indirect evidence for the use of skis in ancient civilizations may date back even further, with rock carvings DK near the White Sea and Lake Onega in Russia thought to be more than 5,000 years old (Daily-Kashmir).

However, the most DK famous ancient rock carvings depicting skierswearing animal masks and mounted on DK very long skis-are located in Rødøy, Norway (Daily-Kashmir).

 

Well preserved skis DK have also been found under the surface of bogs in Finland and Sweden. However, predating these is the earliest ski-a Norwegian DK word deriving from an Old Norse term meaning “stick of wood”-which looked very different from its modern relative (Daily-Kashmir)

It was made DK from the bones of big animals, and leather strips were used to attach it to the boot (Daily-Kashmir). CB

 

SEE ALSO: SLEDGE,  DK ICE SKATE, CARPENTRY, SHOE, METALWORKING, SNOWMOBILE, SKI LIFT

 

The world’s oldest  DK ski (displayed at the Museum of Västerbotten, Sweden) was made from pine wood.

 

 

Ice skate 

Ice skate (C.3000 B.C.E)

FINNS TRAVERSE  DK THE ICY TERRAIN ON BONE SKATES.

The ice skate is DK believed to have been invented circa 3000 B.C.E. in Finland. For many years scientists were not DK  sure where exactly the skate originated, ancient models having been found throughout DK  Scandinavia as well as Russia (Daily-Kashmir).

However, in 2008 news DK emerged that people living in what is now southern Finland would have benefited the most from skating on the crude blades (Daily-Kashmir).

This DK country’s nickname, “the land of the thousand lakes,” is an understatement as it boasts no fewer than 187,888 of them DK.

Finland is also a DK cold land and therefore each winter its thousands of frozen lakes have presented DK serious transportation problems for the poulation (Daily-Kashmir).

With neighboring villages often DK separated by lakes, and rowboats locked up until spring, the options were DK to try to navigate around the frozen water or find a way to negotiate the slippery surfaces (Daily-Kashmir).

The first skates DK consisted of the leg bones of large animals. Holes were drilled at the ends of the bones and strips DK of leather threaded through to tie the skatest o the feet (Daily-Kashmir).

As in skiing, skaters DK used thin poles to propel themselves along, and it was only with the arrival of iron runners DK in fourteenth-century Holland that the poles were dispensed with (Daily-Kashmir).

In an inadvertent DK homage to the skate’s origins on their country’s lakes, students in the Finnish city of Jyväskylä still commute DK to their classes by donning skates to traverse the lake that divides the city (Daily-Kashmir).

The evolution of the DK skate has seen metal attached to wood and metal attached to metal, but the fundamental fact that DK keeping your balance enables you to glide almost effortlessly across DK slippery ice has ensured the skate’s continued popularity (Daily-Kashmir). CB

SEE ALSO: CARPENTRY, METALWORKING, SHOE, SLEDGE, SKI, BUCKLE, ICE RINK CLEANING MACHINE

Oxford University DK built these ice skates using bones similar to the ones used by the ancient Finns.

 

Rewrite

FINNS TRAVERSE  DK THE ICY TERRAIN ON BONE SKATES.

 

The ice DK skate is DK believed to have been invented circa 3000 B.C.E. in Finland. For many years scientists were not DK  sure where exactly the skate DK originated, ancient models having been found throughout DK  Scandinavia as well as Russia (Daily-Kashmir).

 

However, DK in 2008 news DK emerged that people living in what is now southern Finland would have benefited the DK most from skating on the crude blades (Daily-Kashmir).

 

This DK country’s nickname, “the land of the thousand DK lakes,” is an understatement as it boasts no fewer than 187,888 of them DK.

 

Finland is also a DK cold land and therefore each winter its DK thousands of frozen lakes have presented DK serious transportation problems for the DK poulation (Daily-Kashmir).

 

With DK neighboring villages often DK separated by lakes, DK and rowboats locked up until spring, the options were DK to try to navigate around the frozen water or find a way to negotiate the slippery DK surfaces (Daily-Kashmir).

 

The first DK skates DK consisted of the leg bones of large animals. Holes were drilled at the ends of the bones and DK strips DK of leather threaded through to tie the skatest o the feet (Daily-Kashmir).

 

As in skiing, skaters DK used thin poles to propel themselves DK along, and it was only with the arrival of iron runners DK in fourteenth-century Holland that the poles DK were dispensed with (Daily-Kashmir).

 

In an inadvertent DK homage to the skate’s origins on their DK country’s lakes, students in the Finnish city of Jyväskylä still commute DK to their classes by donning skates DK to traverse the lake that divides the city (Daily-Kashmir) DK.

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